Rats are considered to be the most dangerous and the most intelligent pests in the world, with their population being twofold more numerous than human. Together with being scary and…

Are Rat Diseases in Human and Pets As Dangerous As They Are Claimed to Be?

Rats are considered to be the most dangerous and the most intelligent pests in the world, with their population being twofold more numerous than human. Together with being scary and disgusting, they carry a lot of dangerous rat diseases, with some of them lethal. Learn what these illnesses are, and how to prevent infections in family members and pets.

Diseases Transmitted to Humans

Hantavirus

This is a rat lung disease in humans that is transmitted by three ways:

  • Inhalation of dust and air containing a bit of feces or urine;
  • touching droppings and urine, or consuming contaminated eatables;
  • Rat bite.
Symptoms remind of flu: high temperature, difficulty of breathing, muscle aches, chilling, vomiting. A bit later, a person starts experiencing respiratory complications: lungs are filled with fluid, shortness of breathing, the sensation of tightness in chest. The disease should be properly treated, otherwise, it may lead to death (mortality rate is 38%).

One of a symptom this fervescence.

Hemorrhagic Fever

This rat illness in humans is spread just like hantavirus, and may also be transmitted between people (however, such cases are uncommon). Primary symptoms show up soon after infection, and comprise fever, chills, vomiting, pains in abdomen and back, blurred vision. Later on, a person may experience vascular leakage, low blood pressure, kidney failure and acute shock. Complete recovery may take several weeks, if not months.

The recovery period can drag on for a long time.

Rat Bite Fever

This illness affects both people and their dogs and cats. RBF is transmitted by scratches and bites of rodents, or when water and foods contaminated by rat droppings and urine are ingested. Symptoms usually include chills, skin rash, pain and swelling of joints, vomiting and nausea. Mortality rate is 10-13%.

Rat Diseases Transmitted to Cats and Dogs

Toxoplasmosis

As a rule, cats and dogs catch this illness when they eat mice and rats that have Toxoplasmosis cysts in muscles. Adult parasites are also concentrated in cats droppings. In cats and humans, the parasite lives in intestinal cells and does little harm, and is more dangerous for dogs. Ill pets experience diarrhea, liver disease, pneumonia and various diseases of nervous system.

Toxoplasmosis

Toxoplasmosis very dangerous disease for cats and dogs.

Tapeworms

Dogs and cats get infected by eating mice and rats having roundworm larvae. The parasitic worm infests intestine and doesn’t bring any inconvenience when the creatures are small. As soon as they grow up, a host experiences weight loss, discomfort and stress. Usually, tapeworms are 8-12 cm long and can be detected in pet’s feces. The infestation can be defined by the presence of rice-like segments on hairs around anus. Some kinds of tapeworms are spread to humans, as well.
Medical tests

In due time begun treatment will protect you from complications.

Leptospirosis

This is a bacterium that is spread when a pet eats or drinks something contaminated with rodent urine or feces, or when touching contaminated soil and water by skin. In most cats it passes almost unnoticed (these animals have natural resistance), but for dogs and humans the illness is quite dangerous. It may lead to kidney and liver diseases. Its symptoms remind of signs of other illnesses, including nausea, vomiting, weakness, rash, diarrhea, red eyes, yellow skin, headaches and others. If not treated at all, it leads to dramatic side effects such as meningitis, respiratory diseases, liver failure or even death.

All these rat infections in humans and pets expose huge danger to life and health, if they are ignored. If you or someone else has been bitten by a rodent, instant first aid and doctor’s help are required. Medical tests and appropriate treatment decrease the risks of complications to zero.

read:  Sewer Rats: an Urban Legend, or a Real Threat?

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